Jump to content


Photo

Electronic Gurus, I Need Help


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 Dankbud

Dankbud

    X-S Freak

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,094 posts
  • Location:Im a mASShole
  • Interests:Sm0k1n Dutch3s!
  • Xbox Version:v1.1
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 26 January 2004 - 06:10 PM

Ok, heres the scoop.im putting some leds in my controller and trying something different that i havnt seen anyone else do yet. i have 10 low profile (flat) RGB LED's. my plan is to have it blue constantly (5v from usb in controller)and then have a wire from the rumble motor to light the LED up red. so itll flash red when it rumbles. but the problem is, theres 1 positive lead on the LED, the rest are - or ground. so i have the power hooked to 5v w/ a resistor and then a ground to the blue, so the blue is constanly on. i want to send a ground to the red one when the rumble motor rumbles. but when it rumbles it sends a +.... i need that + to be a -. i was gonna try a relay to reverse the polarity but the relays i got are huge... im pretty sure that the - on the rumble is a constant ground. if im wrong that would be perfect and work, but i havnt had a volt meter to test if its constant or not. can i make a small relay w/ diodes and resistors or something to reverse the polarity? heres a little diagram of the led..im gonan try my best to make one. lol.

G-__R- Needs to be - when motor rumbles
B-__+ power

The is the led, the RGB are the colors. RGB need - (ground) to light up.

#2 Emc1683

Emc1683

    X-S Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 744 posts
  • Location:Champaign, IL
  • Xbox Version:v1.0

Posted 26 January 2004 - 06:15 PM

I'm no expert... But wouldnt it work, just throwing the red- on the - on the motor?

Seems to me like it would, but then again, like i said I'm no expert.

If ya got a bunch of em, just test it out. Whats burning out one LED...

#3 Dankbud

Dankbud

    X-S Freak

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,094 posts
  • Location:Im a mASShole
  • Interests:Sm0k1n Dutch3s!
  • Xbox Version:v1.1
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 26 January 2004 - 06:19 PM

QUOTE (Emc1683 @ Jan 26 2004, 08:15 PM)
I'm no expert... But wouldnt it work, just throwing the red- on the - on the motor?

well i could put the - of the led to the - on the motor, but itll be lit up the whole time (i think, if its a constant -. which i think it is....). i dont want that. i want it so when the motor gets + (rumbles) itll reverse the polarity after the motor to the led so the led will light when the motor gets + and rumbles....

#4 Dankbud

Dankbud

    X-S Freak

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,094 posts
  • Location:Im a mASShole
  • Interests:Sm0k1n Dutch3s!
  • Xbox Version:v1.1
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 26 January 2004 - 07:16 PM

any1??? c'mon there has to be a way....

#5 cueball13

cueball13

    X-S Messiah

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,010 posts

Posted 26 January 2004 - 08:02 PM

Try using a transistor, hooking the positive from the motor to the base of the transistor. Then connect the led ground to collector and the ground wire to emitter. I think that should work. But keep in mind if you do that, you're going to get blue when it's not rumbling and like purple when it is since you've got the blue always on. You could use another transistor if you wanted to switch the blue off at the same time as switching the red on, but I'm not certain exactly how you'd arrange that in the circuit. You could even use a 2pdt relay, that'd be pretty simple. Connect the motor through the coil and put your ground for the leds into each of the commons....then put the blue - on one pole's NC and the red - on the other pole's NO. I'm sure there's another way, but I don't yet have much experience with transistors.

#6 vona_a

vona_a

    X-S X-perience

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 430 posts
  • Xbox Version:unk
  • 360 version:unknown

Posted 26 January 2004 - 08:07 PM

If your LED's are indeed common anode (sharing the + pin) then just use a 74LS04 Hex inverter to invert the RED wire signal from the rumble motor.... its a very easy hookup, and will do exactlywhat you want to. The chip is small, works +5V and GND, and specs sheets can be found on digikey.com

From what I know of RGB's though, there's a different Forward Voltage for Red vs Blue/Green, so dont share the same resistor on the + pin, instead hookup a different resistor for each led leg to GND.

#7 Dankbud

Dankbud

    X-S Freak

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,094 posts
  • Location:Im a mASShole
  • Interests:Sm0k1n Dutch3s!
  • Xbox Version:v1.1
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 26 January 2004 - 09:03 PM

QUOTE (vona_a @ Jan 26 2004, 10:07 PM)
If your LED's are indeed common anode (sharing the + pin) then just use a 74LS04 Hex inverter to invert the RED wire signal from the rumble motor.... its a very easy hookup, and will do exactlywhat you want to.  The chip is small, works +5V and GND, and specs sheets can be found on digikey.com

From what I know of RGB's though, there's a different Forward Voltage for Red vs Blue/Green, so dont share the same resistor on the + pin, instead hookup a different resistor for each led leg to GND.


i think im gonna try the transistor route. i checked on google about them, i found ""P" is for a positive charged layer and "N" is for a negative charged layer. Transistors are either NPN or PNP in the configuration of the layers. There is no particular difference here except the polarity of voltages that need to be applied to make the transistor operate."

so id want a NPN and put the + from the rumble to the P and the - from the led to one of the N's?


I just found this................

"Basic Circuit :
The Base [B] is the On/Off switch for the transistor. If a current is flowing to the Base, there will be a path from the Collector [C] to the Emitter [E] where current can flow (The Switch is On.) If there is no current flowing to the Base, then no current can flow from the Collector to the Emitter. (The Switch is Off.)
Below is the basic circuit we will use for all of our transistors. "

user posted image

So if i put +5v to B and C, E will equal - ground? is this correct?
If so, does B have to be constant and C is + from the motor? or can both be + from the motor?





QUOTE
From what I know of RGB's though, there's a different Forward Voltage for Red vs Blue/Green, so dont share the same resistor on the + pin, instead hookup a different resistor for each led leg to GND.


so put a resistor on the ground side? i thought resistors had to go on the positive side?

#8 twistedsymphony

twistedsymphony

    arrogant beyond belief

  • Head Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,466 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Almost Canada http://solid-orange.com
  • Interests:Consoles, Computers, Cars, Arcades, Home Theater, and the modding of anything that moves.
  • Xbox Version:v1.0
  • 360 version:v2 (zephyr)

Posted 26 January 2004 - 09:26 PM

yeah you got it ... a transister is what you want to use if you're just gonna do 1 led... if you need to invert more than that I'd recomend the hex inverter that vona suggested...

yeah the transister is cheap and easy to find if you only inverting 1 signal... but if you're doing more than that go with hex inverter. as it's much easier and smaller than a bunch of transisters.

also it doesn't matter what side of the LED the resister goes on... as long as it's there.

however you need to think of the RGB LEDs as 3 separate LEDs that have 3 different voltage requirements... since they share the + side, in order to get the different voltages you need to have a different resistance on each of the negative legs. you can 1 single resister on the + leg so long as it's strong enough for all 3 LEDs. But keep in mind that they might be slighly different in brightness this way.

#9 Dankbud

Dankbud

    X-S Freak

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,094 posts
  • Location:Im a mASShole
  • Interests:Sm0k1n Dutch3s!
  • Xbox Version:v1.1
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 26 January 2004 - 10:13 PM

thanx twisted! i was waiting for u to chime in wink.gif

#10 antiflag1980

antiflag1980

    X-S X-perience

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Location:Cincinnati, OH
  • Xbox Version:v1.0

Posted 26 January 2004 - 10:14 PM

QUOTE (twistedsymphony @ Jan 26 2004, 11:26 PM)
also it doesn't matter what side of the LED the resister goes on... as long as it's there.

Yeah he's right, it's gonna raise the ohm meausurement no matter what side it's on so less electrons will be pulled towards the negatively charged side no matter what side the resistor is on.

#11 cueball13

cueball13

    X-S Messiah

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,010 posts

Posted 26 January 2004 - 10:53 PM

Wow, I was at least technically accurate despite not knowing the easiest way. I'm proud of myself.

#12 Dankbud

Dankbud

    X-S Freak

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,094 posts
  • Location:Im a mASShole
  • Interests:Sm0k1n Dutch3s!
  • Xbox Version:v1.1
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 26 January 2004 - 11:45 PM

QUOTE (cueball13 @ Jan 27 2004, 12:53 AM)
Wow, I was at least technically accurate despite not knowing the easiest way. I'm proud of myself.

yup, ty smile.gif

#13 Dankbud

Dankbud

    X-S Freak

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,094 posts
  • Location:Im a mASShole
  • Interests:Sm0k1n Dutch3s!
  • Xbox Version:v1.1
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 26 January 2004 - 11:57 PM

QUOTE
So if i put +5v to B and C, E will equal - ground? is this correct?
If so, does B have to be constant and C is + from the motor? or can both be + from the motor?


is this for NPN or PNP?but i still dont understand how it going to work.. wouldnt i want something like PPN? cause i want to go from power to a negative? i have 2 NPN ones...

#14 Dankbud

Dankbud

    X-S Freak

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,094 posts
  • Location:Im a mASShole
  • Interests:Sm0k1n Dutch3s!
  • Xbox Version:v1.1
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 27 January 2004 - 12:02 AM

QUOTE (Dankbud @ Jan 27 2004, 01:57 AM)
QUOTE
So if i put +5v to B and C, E will equal - ground? is this correct?
If so, does B have to be constant and C is + from the motor? or can both be + from the motor?


is this for NPN or PNP?but i still dont understand how it going to work.. wouldnt i want something like PPN? cause i want to go from power to a negative? i have 2 NPN ones...

wait, i put negative to both N's and the power from the rumble motor to P? the circuit completes when P (from a NPN) gets power from the motor. so that will complete the ground right??

#15 bob851

bob851

    X-S Enthusiast

  • Members
  • 25 posts

Posted 27 January 2004 - 12:03 AM

i have a small circuit solution but you will need to get different leds.

user posted image

i tested it and it works.
i can make a small avi if you want to see it work
it turns out that the negative side on the motor is high on inactivity and goes low with activity

Edited by bob851, 27 January 2004 - 12:19 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users