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How To Repair A Dead Power Supply?


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#1 hurtz

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Posted 11 April 2004 - 04:55 PM

I have a dead Foxlink power supply. The fuse seems OK, I tested continuity with my meter. None of the compents appear to be fried. Whats the next step? I really want to learn how to repair these rather than just replace it.

Thanks,
hurtz


#2 d7onr8

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Posted 11 April 2004 - 09:30 PM

Check www.llamma.com under repair tutorials for some power supply help.

#3 Headly

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Posted 11 April 2004 - 10:51 PM

This thread is about a delta power supply but it might help.HERE

#4 hurtz

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Posted 12 April 2004 - 11:51 AM

There is nothing on llama.com that shows you how to repair a dead power supply.

The Foxlink dosen't have a pot to adjust.

Any other suggestions?

hurtz

#5 AmericanDemon

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Posted 12 April 2004 - 02:01 PM

Replace it, if it works then you know it was the PS. If not then you have a spare for that new system you will be building from Llama.com smile.gif

#6 hurtz

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Posted 12 April 2004 - 02:40 PM

I already swapped it with a working power supply from another unit, so I know this one is bad.

I'm looking for information on how to test the components. Has anyone successfully repaired one of these?

hurtz


#7 hurtz

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Posted 17 April 2004 - 01:16 AM

So I'm assuming no one wastes time attempting to repair power supplies?

Is the foxlink a crappy supply as compared to the delta?



#8 Arakon

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Posted 17 April 2004 - 01:33 AM

actually no. I had a foxlink that blew up cause it was hooked to 220V (it was a 110V one), and not only did it work for about 30 secs with the way high voltage, but it only took a new filter cap to get it working perfectly again, all other components survived the overvoltage.


#9 Boomhower

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Posted 17 April 2004 - 08:34 PM

damn i have a box of about 4 or 5 dead power supplies, all delta except one, its a minebea. All fuses are good, but none power up. I tried the pot tweak for the deltas, but that didn't work on any of em. I tested the wires and they all have continuity. I shocked myself from one of those big ass 200v capacitors on one of em, so i know power is getting that far dry.gif , but I really don't know where to go from there. I don't know how to test the components, except for fuses and resistors. Does anyone know if there is a tut somewhere, or maybe have another solution to fixing these? Or maybe just a link to testing electrical components in general, like capacitors and transistors and other odd looking things on there?

Edited by Boomhower, 17 April 2004 - 08:37 PM.


#10 Troed

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Posted 18 April 2004 - 10:19 AM

I've repaired a Foxlink. 220V applied to a 110V model .. blew the varistor. Replaced it (and the fuse which was also blown) with another varistor of close spec and it works fine now.

The varistor was visibly blown, so that might not be your problem.



#11 Chancer

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Posted 18 April 2004 - 10:45 AM

Get a replacement for what they cost. you already know its the PSU so you won't be wasting your cash. Unless you understand how switch mode power supplies work and have experience in repairing them you will be very lucky to fix it at all. yes I know if it is something visible you may spot it and have a chance but you alreday said it is not so go on treat yourself to a new one and you have the Xbox back and running
If you are desperate to learn how to repair this sort of stuff then you will need to go to night school/ college or whatever. when I did my apprenticeship it was 5 years at college not sure what it is now. Even when you are done with the training there are still problems with some stuff such as none availibility of circuit diagrams etc.

Edited by Chancer, 18 April 2004 - 10:49 AM.





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