Jump to content


Photo

White And Red Led


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Kev052683

Kev052683

    X-S Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 545 posts
  • Xbox Version:v1.4
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 17 September 2004 - 03:36 PM

Man, I thought I was the man, when i used my kick ass math skills and came up with the fact that the 3.3V for my white LED and the 1.7V for my Red LED added up to 5V. I haven't done it yet, but I thought about how you regulate how much voltage is going to be going to each LED. I knew just wiring it up so they both ground and they both use the 5V from the controller port would be way too easy. So i guess my question is, to have a white and a red LED in each controller port, how would I go about wiring this? Thanks in advance!

#2 SLuSHIE

SLuSHIE

    X-S Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 740 posts
  • Location:Canada
  • Xbox Version:v1.1
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 17 September 2004 - 04:57 PM

in xbox 1 i got all white leds in controller ports all with its 100 ohm resistors, xbox 2 all green, xbox 3 all diff. colors, just use a 100 ohm resistor take the metal off the controller port thing red for power black for ground

#3 Zodiiak

Zodiiak

    X-S Freak

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,865 posts
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Interests:Life
  • Xbox Version:v1.0
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 17 September 2004 - 05:36 PM

I did the same with Blue and White. This tutorial should help:
http://xbox-scene.co...s/port-leds.php

#4 drRAVALOT

drRAVALOT

    X-S Senior Member

  • XS-BANNED
  • PipPip
  • 218 posts
  • Xbox Version:unk

Posted 17 September 2004 - 06:07 PM

sounds good .... post some pics...............

#5 drRAVALOT

drRAVALOT

    X-S Senior Member

  • XS-BANNED
  • PipPip
  • 218 posts
  • Xbox Version:unk

Posted 17 September 2004 - 06:08 PM

sounds good .... post some pics...............

#6 Kev052683

Kev052683

    X-S Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 545 posts
  • Xbox Version:v1.4
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 17 September 2004 - 07:53 PM

OK, maybe I should clarify this. I've done the ports before with white LEDs, and yeah the 100 ohm resistors worked wonders. I'm more wondering about what I should do to wire one LED that's a 3.3V and one LED that's at 1.7V to use the 5V supply. I can't just wire up both positives to the red wire and assume it'll magically disperse the power that I want it to be at (3.3 and 1.7). I also thought about doing it in series (I think that's the way where a pos. is connected to a negative, etc), but I didn't know if that'd work either.

#7 ThrustinJ

ThrustinJ

    X-S Young Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 50 posts

Posted 17 September 2004 - 08:56 PM

EDIT: Solder in parallel. Use the appropriate resistor for your RED led. I don't understand the problem.

Edited by ThrustinJ, 17 September 2004 - 08:58 PM.


#8 Kev052683

Kev052683

    X-S Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 545 posts
  • Xbox Version:v1.4
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 18 September 2004 - 02:35 AM

I dont think you understand the question if you don't see the problem. If I use a resistor that limits the voltage to 1.7, my white LED is going to be dull as all get out.

#9 XboxDude87

XboxDude87

    X-S Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 555 posts
  • Xbox Version:unk

Posted 18 September 2004 - 02:38 AM

Here is the answer to your problem.

http://lsdiodes.com/tutorial/

QUOTE
"Why do the LEDs have to be the same color?"
If you mix colors, say if you paralleled a red (~2.3V) and two blue (~3.5V), the blue LEDs would not light. Why's this? Because the electricity is going to take the easiest path it can to complete the circuit and in this scenario the red LED requires less energy, leaving the two blue unpowered and lonely. To fix this you would need to stick a resistor onto the leg of each LED to 'equalize' all of the LEDs. Note illustration:



To find the resistor you'd need for each LED, use the 'Single LED' portion of an LED calculator, type in the supply voltage, LED's voltage and 20mA for each LED and there you go. Now each LED will turn on and each will receive it's desired amount of power. Thanks to Mike Moorrees for pointing this out, "The resistors act like 'shocks' in a car, they give the power source some 'squish' and let each LED find its happy place (forward voltage)."


this is at the bottom of the tutorials page. go there for the picture.


#10 xxlancerevoviiixx

xxlancerevoviiixx

    X-S Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 274 posts
  • Location:Around somewhere
  • Xbox Version:v1.0

Posted 18 September 2004 - 02:45 AM

180 Ohm for the 1.7 V led. and 100 Ohm for the 3.3 V led. not that hard look at my sig!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users