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#1 dethbox

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Posted 23 September 2004 - 11:26 PM

Is the resistor crucial to the optimal/safe operation of the controller dongle LED? If I exclude the resistor and just slap in an LED, will this cause problems for my Xbox or just the LED? I don't care if the LED burns out, I do however care if the Xbox burns out. Any insight would be appreciated. Thanks.

#2 xxlancerevoviiixx

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Posted 23 September 2004 - 11:59 PM

i dont think u want 5 volts going to one 3.6v led.. so yes i would use the resistor.

#3 hyfall381

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 12:06 AM

def use a led. i used a 100ohm one for each led. no problems.

#4 investinwaffles

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 04:46 AM

funny story:

i wanted to see what would happen if i used a led wit out a resistor. so i took one of my 5mm leds, blue btw, and plugged it in to the xbox. then i turned it on and it was green. then i saw a spark, and it scared the shit out of me. now the led is broken. so... how was your day?

#5 eNatural

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 06:07 AM

Hehe, I hooked up three orange leds straight to 12 volts for fun... They turned orange for about 1 second and then crackled away smile.gif Needless to say the plastic melted and there were burn marks on them. They dont work....

#6 dirtytricks

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 09:36 AM

i was testing a bi color led to see which leg was for which color. so i held it byt he bulb and didnt use a resistor. immediatly when i turned the box on the bulb exploded and cat me an ever so slight cut ont he finger. see, not using resistors is a hazard to your life, what if i were holding the led with my eyelid? i would be blind, thats what.

#7 Scaramanga

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 09:46 AM

You don't understand, this is not some lightbulb that will burn after X hours.
The led CANT handle more than its max voltage, it will simply burn/blow.
You must use the proper resistor.

#8 dirtytricks

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 10:05 AM

you can use it with an improper resistor but it will either die early or be very dim.

#9 The Timmy

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 10:05 AM

no, no NO!

LED's are current driven. if say, you over drive an LED and measure the voltage across it, you will only get whatever the forward voltage of the LED is. of course, you won't be able to measure it for long before it burns up.

it's the current you're limiting when you add a resistor.

you can test this fact by putting a 3.6 volt LED on a properly limited power source, then put an LED with a much lower forward voltage (say 2.0 volts or so) on top of it (paralell). normally, the higher voltage led will go out and the lower one will be the only one that shines. --this is because the loewr voltage LED clamps the voltage off at whatever the hell it's forward voltage is. if this doesn't happen, then its likely the two LED's are too close in value to each other, that or the higher voltage LED has a low minimum voltage requirement.

either way, it's not the voltage that kills an LED, it's the current.

a little knowlage is a dangerous thing.

edit:
that's (one reason) why it's reccomended to use one resistor per LED when dealing with multiple LED that are of different colors and values.

Edited by The Timmy, 24 September 2004 - 10:08 AM.


#10 Scaramanga

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 01:32 PM

V=IxR
Its all the same thing rolleyes.gif
calculating volt drops is easier though than calculating the way the current splits.

#11 Zodiiak

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 03:51 PM

QUOTE (Scaramanga @ Sep 24 2004, 09:35 AM)
V=IxR
Its all the same thing rolleyes.gif
calculating volt drops is easier though than calculating the way the current splits.

Yes, gotta love Mr Kirchoff (if I spelled his name right).

Just use a resistor, in fact always use resistors when working with LEDs on the xbox. Get a load of 100ohms, you're going to need them wink.gif




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