Jump to content


Photo

Games Promote Violence? Yes Or No


  • Please log in to reply
42 replies to this topic

#16 nectar12

nectar12

    X-S Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Xbox Version:v1.4
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 04 March 2006 - 06:54 AM

not sure what the big deal is about the ad .. if those were white guys in the pic, it wouldn't look realistic at all.. in fact it would be fucking hilarious.

#17 Mikeizzle

Mikeizzle

    X-S Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 213 posts

Posted 04 March 2006 - 07:17 AM

QUOTE(VariableElite @ Mar 3 2006, 08:01 AM) View Post

The only game to tend to provoke violence in myself is Dead or Alive 4.
AFter the 10th time in a row of getting owned by a 10-hit combo that takes away most of my character's health, I have been tempted to throw my controller through the following:
  • my Samsung HDTV
  • a wall
  • a window
  • another wall
  • whoever just knocked on my bedroom door as I was starting to win
  • the ceiling
I actually bit the controller one time (think Shaun of the Dead and his phone).

A friend, who actually played the game long enough to unlock the Spartan, informs me that he was considering controller abuse as well.


Ahahahahaha LMAO laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif .

Anyway, "it exploited racial stereotypes and glorified violence" what the hell? oh, and all the 'gangstaz' and 'ho's' in friggin rap videos dont?, Video Games are the same form of media at TV and movies, I just dont understand why people have to pick on the game industy so much. You wanna stop violence?, teach your kid right from wrong. You wanna not have your kid playing the latest GTA?, take the damn thing away from him or dont buy it at all. Man, why should we have to suffer for your retarded lazyness.

#18 Jstraw

Jstraw

    X-S Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 73 posts
  • Location:East Coast USA
  • Interests:Blowing things up, putting them back together then blowing them up again!
  • Xbox Version:v1.4
  • 360 version:v5.0 (360S - trinity)

Posted 04 March 2006 - 07:26 AM

blink.gif There are certain entities in this world who believe that we become what we experience. Nature vs Nurture. What a way to make someone, or lets say a group of people, extremely aggressive. Lets show them more violence you say? Yes yes, what a good idea. Thus, the creation of violent movies, videogames, and radio. The only problem is, now we are addicted to it! i dunno, maybe I read too many books or something! Who knows? rolleyes.gif

#19 jdkay20

jdkay20

    X-S Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 217 posts
  • Xbox Version:v1.4
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 04 March 2006 - 07:34 AM

I think that video game glitches make people violent
Like when you playing a game and the game glithes and you die nothing makes me more upset. Also I think that if you suck at video games you will become more violent.
There is a time during a video game where you become more violent usually around the middle. You think you can do better but then can't.

I personally have lost me temper on quite a few video games and broken
2 controllers
3 holes in my door
a hole in the wall
an office chair
and a few high scores along the way

Edited by jdkay20, 04 March 2006 - 07:34 AM.


#20 smartygre1

smartygre1

    X-S Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 166 posts

Posted 06 March 2006 - 06:34 PM

Most folks just improperly equate correllation with causality. There is a correllation between violence in youth and video games. Meaning that there is some relationship between youth violence and violent video games. That does not mean that video games cause violence.

A violent youth is likely to play violent video games. The games didn't make him violent, his upbringing, place in society and backround did. But the media and the moral majority can't believe that little Johnny is violent because he is poor, so they see a copy of GTA in his bedroom and now have someone to blame (because nobody will take responsibility for their own actions anymore).

Does anyone remember how the Ozzy song, "suicide solution" was the "cause" of a teen's suicde? This is the same witchhunt. Rock and Roll, Movies/TV, and video games are the scapegoat used by a society that just can't accept that it is partially responsible for this fu#$ked up kid.

#21 No_Name

No_Name

    X-S Freak

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,154 posts

Posted 06 March 2006 - 07:40 PM

Where to begin.

Games can influance behavour if left unchecked. Children and adults alike need to have an understand of what is right and wrong and what is real and what is not.

Video games have always been away to move out of reality however games are starting to mimic virual worlds and bringing mroe reality to the fake worlds.

GTA3 is the first example of a game where the user had very few limits to what he or she could do and that is why the game was rated for older teens and adults.
HOWEVER it became the must have series and the parents stoped caring what little Jonny was playing in his room for hours on end.

Many parents even people my age do not really understand video games and are less willing to say no to the request for a game. Parents also do not appear to under stand the vasious rating systems used in the various countries. I was in one shop one day and had the shop staff tell a customer the PEFI rating on the box was a difficulty level if staff are not informed then how can customers be.

Then we have the media. TV, Books and movies are showing us more and more graphic voliance and content of a sexual nature, we have more and more channels and mroe and TV's in our home. I remember getting a C64 and my parents letting us have the second TV in the bedroom to play it on now some home have 1 TV per room and young children are used to having a TV in their room.

To sum up games are not bad. But then games are not a subsiuite for good parenting and social interaction. Games should be about having fun and enjoying yourself but it should not be the soul activity of your life.
If I ever have children I plan to pay alot of attention to what they do and encorage them to read books more then watching TV and playing games as well as restricting their access to content I deam to be unsitable. I dont always agree with ratings on movies and games but thats because I know myself and what I was taught when I was younger.

Censorhip is not the answer at all.

#22 JustDanMI

JustDanMI

    X-S Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 665 posts
  • Location:Hazel Park, MI
  • Interests:outdoors and gaming
  • Xbox Version:v1.4
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 06 March 2006 - 09:03 PM

personally, I think one of the most violent things is the public news. It's always bad news about someone killing somebody else, or arson or some crap. And how do you tell your kids that's fake? We live in a world of violence, learn to live with it. Of course, maybe it's because I live near Detroit that I hear of all of the killings. Hell, in one night I counted 13 deaths while watching the news.

#23 handles25

handles25

    X-S X-perience

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 355 posts

Posted 06 March 2006 - 10:32 PM

I feel like punching fools after some FNR 3, but im not a big guy. It would be a very bad idea. Reminds me of how id feel after some Tysons Punch Out.

You just cant be dumb enough to act on it.


Edited by handles25, 06 March 2006 - 10:33 PM.


#24 twistedsymphony

twistedsymphony

    arrogant beyond belief

  • Head Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,466 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Almost Canada http://solid-orange.com
  • Interests:Consoles, Computers, Cars, Arcades, Home Theater, and the modding of anything that moves.
  • Xbox Version:v1.0
  • 360 version:v2 (zephyr)

Posted 06 March 2006 - 11:06 PM

QUOTE(smartygre1 @ Mar 6 2006, 12:41 PM) View Post

Most folks just improperly equate correlation with causality. There is a correlation between violence in youth and video games. Meaning that there is some relationship between youth violence and violent video games. That does not mean that video games cause violence.

A violent youth is likely to play violent video games. The games didn't make him violent, his upbringing, place in society and background did. But the media and the moral majority can't believe that little Johnny is violent because he is poor, so they see a copy of GTA in his bedroom and now have someone to blame (because nobody will take responsibility for their own actions anymore).

Does anyone remember how the Ozzy song, "suicide solution" was the "cause" of a teen's suicide? This is the same witchhunt. Rock and Roll, Movies/TV, and video games are the scapegoat used by a society that just can't accept that it is partially responsible for this fu#$ked up kid.


you pretty much summed up my thoughts exactly... completely with the "correlation =! causality" argument.

The problem is:
- Parents for not taking responsibility for their children's actions
- Parent for not bringing their child up to distinguish right from wrong and make proper life decisions.
- Parents for not being involved enough to notice what they're children are playing/what they're buying for them
- Game stores that still don't check IDs for M rated games, or enlighten parents when they're obviously making a purchase for someone under aged.
- Old farts who still think video games are only for children
- Jack Thompson
- Game companies who go out of their way to make games like this just to get their name in the media for a while
- Game companies who don't have an original thought in their head so they resort to sensationalized violence instead of something creative and new.

I've always been of the opinion that we should be free to do what we want until the point where what we want to do impinges on someone elses freedom... All this censorship crap does is hurt people's freedoms.

If you want to be free you have to be willing to accecpt the good with the bad...


#25 dgrams2003

dgrams2003

    X-S Senior Member

  • XS-BANNED
  • PipPip
  • 297 posts
  • Xbox Version:unk
  • 360 version:unknown

Posted 07 March 2006 - 12:17 AM

In answer to original question: Yes.

Do I still like and play violent games even after answering yes?: Yes.



#26 Rustmonkey

Rustmonkey

    X-S Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 604 posts
  • Location:Laurel, MT
  • Xbox Version:v1.4
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 07 March 2006 - 12:35 AM

Its the old aurgument of nature vs. nurture... are they born that way or taught to be that way? Or are they genetically predisposed and something in their nurturing that triggers it (ie video games, violent media, etc.). Seems to be the case, but we can't exactly screen for this... anyways, no one will ever win this battle.

#27 FSG

FSG

    X-S X-perience

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 341 posts
  • Xbox Version:v1.0
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 07 March 2006 - 12:45 AM

QUOTE(Rustmonkey @ Mar 6 2006, 06:42 PM) View Post

Its the old aurgument of nature vs. nurture... are they born that way or taught to be that way? Or are they genetically predisposed and something in their nurturing that triggers it (ie video games, violent media, etc.). Seems to be the case, but we can't exactly screen for this... anyways, no one will ever win this battle.


Yea I agree with you on that.

But my opinion its not the game company's fault its the parents. Like Halo 2 is rated M you cant buy that unless your 17 or older. Which means younger kids need parents with them when they get it.

#28 dgrams2003

dgrams2003

    X-S Senior Member

  • XS-BANNED
  • PipPip
  • 297 posts
  • Xbox Version:unk
  • 360 version:unknown

Posted 07 March 2006 - 01:56 AM

...that also means that the parents should be with the kids when they play it.
Not just when they buy it.

If the parent doesn't think its appropriate for their child, (whether it pisses off
the child or not) they should take it away.

I have no respect for parents that don't monitor what their kids are doing on the
internet or know what kind of games their kids are playing.
Even those that have 'good' kids, need to know what their kids are doing.

Edited by dgrams2003, 07 March 2006 - 01:58 AM.


#29 Rustmonkey

Rustmonkey

    X-S Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 604 posts
  • Location:Laurel, MT
  • Xbox Version:v1.4
  • 360 version:v1 (xenon)

Posted 07 March 2006 - 08:19 PM

QUOTE(dgrams2003 @ Mar 6 2006, 06:03 PM) View Post

...that also means that the parents should be with the kids when they play it.
Not just when they buy it.

If the parent doesn't think its appropriate for their child, (whether it pisses off
the child or not) they should take it away.

I have no respect for parents that don't monitor what their kids are doing on the
internet or know what kind of games their kids are playing.
Even those that have 'good' kids, need to know what their kids are doing.



Exactly - these games aren't made with kids in mind (even though they are part of the market)...

thats why we have a ratings system...

Edited by Rustmonkey, 07 March 2006 - 08:20 PM.


#30 Z3R0 CO0L

Z3R0 CO0L

    X-S Enthusiast

  • Members
  • 26 posts
  • Location:London, UK
  • Xbox Version:v1.3
  • 360 version:none

Posted 08 March 2006 - 02:32 AM

QUOTE(twistedsymphony @ Mar 6 2006, 10:13 PM) View Post


- Game stores that still don't check IDs for M rated games, or enlighten parents when they're obviously making a purchase for someone under aged.


While I agree with all of the points stated in your post this one is only partially true.
I work in a game store and will point out to a customer that if they are buying the title for a younger person that it contains violence, or sexual content or whatever. However this does not usually deter the customer from buying the game (at least 95% of the time) because of such nature, most parents just don't seem to give a damn what their kids are playing (not sure if the same is true outside of the UK), and have lost the ability to turn around to their kid and just say "NO! little Johnny you can't have that", it's almost like they're scared.
Many times I have refused a sale to a customer because I believe they just do not give a damn, and on many occasions I have explained the content and sold the game knowing full well they didn't listen to a word I had said, only to have them come back the next day complaining about the content.
Good old fashioned parenting could probably solve the problems with society today and there would be no need to place blame on games/media.

Hell, I've played a bucketload of violent games, but I am not a violent person, I put this down to the way my parents raised me.

If you want to place blame on something blame it on bad parenting and guns.

Just my 2 cents biggrin.gif




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users