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A Concept For Obtaining The 2048 Key


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#1 nickolasj80

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 05:32 AM

First off, I know very little about hacking, so if this post is erroneous, please correct me.

Ok, as I understand it, this almighty 2048-bit key is used to sign the games played on the 360. Hopefully I have that much correct.

Anyways, the number has to be passed between the software and the hardware somewhere, at sometime during the game boot process. So, would it it not be possible to rig a jtag to every possible tx/rx spot on the board, and monitor what is passed, in hopes of "capturing" the key?

thoughts?

#2 mylakerye

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 07:09 AM

i also had some kind of idea like this as i read through that monstrous thread full of people who thought brute forcing a 2048-bit key was a good idea...

My idea was ripping two different isos and searching for similar code, but very quickly I realized this was impractical. As far as your idea, I think the 360 encrypts the key to shit, and its close to impossible to intercept the key once theres a handoff

Honestly, i don't think signing the content we want to boot on our precious 360s is the solution to making it bootable. I think if there was a chance of the key being retrieved it would have already...

Edited by mylakerye, 05 January 2007 - 07:11 AM.


#3 No_Name

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 08:17 AM

Google Public Key Private Key

Read

Then post

#4 mylakerye

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 08:36 AM

haha ok 2 minutes on wikipedia made me feel like an ass, I get it now - thanks no name




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