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Inside the Xbox 360 Wireless Racing Wheel


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#1 Xbox-Scene

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 05:03 AM

Inside the Xbox 360 Wireless Racing Wheel
Posted by XanTium | October 22 00:03 EST | News Category: Xbox360
 
From eetindia.co.in:


Upon taking apart the many layers of plastic that comprise the steering wheel controller, the main PCB is exposed. There are three large ICs, two with Microsoft markings, and a third, the Atmel AT91SAM7S32. The interesting parts are the Microsoft parts. Obviously Microsoft does not make chips, so whose ICs are they? We asked the good people of Semiconductor Insights to de-encapsulate (or decap) the devices to find out.

Looking first at the shielded wireless device labelled "Microsoft X80199," it is revealed to be a National Semiconductor LMX420CL. Further inspection of the die reveals RF and analogue circuitry, as well as a significant amount of logic. From the FCC filings associated with this device, the 2.4-GHz band is mentioned as the communications frequency, so this device is indeed a Bluetooth transceiver. This device cannot be found on the National Semiconductor Web site, but could be similar to their other LMX labelled Bluetooth offerings.

The second Microsoft die, labelled "X81376," contains another National Semiconductor device, the SC14470C mixed-signal microcontroller. This is one of two microcontrollers on the PCB, combining with the Atmel AT91SAM7 to provide the processing power for the steering wheel.


Full Story: eetindia.co.in






#2 koolkid1935

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 06:10 AM

Without doing much research on the lmx4270c, how can the FCC mentioning the 2.4GHz band automatically mean it is bluetooth? The little research that I did do revealed that the normal 360 wireless controllers have the same 4270C controller, but again, they are not bluetooth, nor is the 360 even equipped for bluetooth. IIRC, Microsoft is using a proprietary method of wireless transmission that just so happens to also use the 2.4GHz band.

QUOTE
It seems that these two parts are hand-picked by Microsoft for all their Bluetooth communications with the Xbox 360 game consoles.
Again, the 360 has never used bluetooth that I know of.

Edited by koolkid1935, 22 October 2008 - 06:16 AM.


#3 johnnyrico

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 02:13 PM

doubt these are bluetooth devices,
as practical proof i wanna point out the following:
- no bluetooth tools on my cell phone nor my linux system detected any bluetooth MAC adresses other than my notebook's and my cell phone's.
- bluetooth really eats batteries, making it impratical for wireless game controllers.


I don't see why they immediately conclude it's bluetooth because it's 2.4 Ghz FCC registered, 802.11 networks operate in the 2.4 Ghz spectrum too, as do some DECT phones.

poor work on the writer's part to immediately conclude it's bluetooth, otherwise I'd just pair my earpod with my 360 to have it work as a wireless headset, or pair a wireless headset with my phone or laptop. :-/


also, I don't see WHY such a document is being written NOW? the racing wheel has been at retailers for a long time now, there has been enough time to find anything important about it.

Edited by johnnyrico, 22 October 2008 - 02:16 PM.


#4 Elemino

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 03:51 PM

Just because MS does not make chips does not mean it's not theirs. There are a lot of companies that go out and request a company to make a chip for them that is special to their needs and no one else uses. It happens all the time. The processor is a classic example. Built by IBM but only found in the 360.

#5 tyraen

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 04:23 PM

Unless it's something lame like they tweaked the frequency so that the devices wouldn't be recognized as normal Bluetooth signals, but still used Bluetooth underneath, just so they could restrict the devices that connected to the console.

#6 tabicat

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 04:45 PM

QUOTE(koolkid1935 @ Oct 22 2008, 12:46 AM) View Post

Without doing much research on the lmx4270c, how can the FCC mentioning the 2.4GHz band automatically mean it is bluetooth?

I came here to say exactly that.

Besides, the link does not point to the original article, which is here: http://www.eetimes.c...cleID=211201701

I've emailed the author asking for clarification. I'll post back if I get a reply.

#7 Mozbius

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 06:27 PM

QUOTE(johnnyrico @ Oct 22 2008, 01:49 PM) View Post

- bluetooth really eats batteries, making it impratical for wireless game controllers.



PS3 does use bluetooth...

#8 Elemino

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 08:19 PM

QUOTE(Mozbius @ Oct 22 2008, 01:03 PM) View Post

PS3 does use bluetooth...
You have a point. And for that matter, if that were true bluetooth would be an unreasonable solution for cell phones as they push harder and harder to make them more efficient for longer talk times on such small batteries.

#9 tabicat

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 10:14 PM

QUOTE(tabicat @ Oct 22 2008, 11:21 AM) View Post
I've emailed the author asking for clarification. I'll post back if I get a reply.

Ok, I heard back from the author. Basically, he has no real evidence that it's Bluetooth-based other than the chips used are from a family of Bluetooth devices. He said he'd correct the article.





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