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Power Supply Plugged In Wrong Voltage 110v To Plugged In A 220v


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#1 linsonchan

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 11:59 AM

Power Supply plugged in wrong voltage 110v to plugged in a 220v, how do I fix this? what should I replace, already tried replacing the fuse and still does not work, flows the fuse off..


Anyone here technical about this stuff?

thank you

#2 MadMaxGR

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 12:14 PM

QUOTE(linsonchan @ Mar 31 2010, 12:59 PM) View Post

Power Supply plugged in wrong voltage 110v to plugged in a 220v, how do I fix this? what should I replace, already tried replacing the fuse and still does not work, flows the fuse off..
Anyone here technical about this stuff?

thank you


Usually when it happens the PSU gets busted! means it is more than a fuse that you have to change. Just buy a new PSU (there are good chinese or pull-off PSUs around)

EDIT: I would never trust a busted PSU after repair. Some other components might be malfunctioning and will damage your console as well.

Edited by MadMaxGR, 31 March 2010 - 12:16 PM.


#3 linsonchan

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 12:18 PM

i want to know whats to replace... not just replace the entire psu.

its better to know how to repair that than replace it.... a bit of knowledge wont hurt.... now would it?

#4 MadMaxGR

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 01:09 PM

QUOTE(linsonchan @ Mar 31 2010, 01:18 PM) View Post

i want to know whats to replace... not just replace the entire psu.

its better to know how to repair that than replace it.... a bit of knowledge wont hurt.... now would it?


I guess that you didn't read my comment or you don't speak such good english? Even if you fnd the problem now.. lets say a capacitor that has leaked... there might another capacitor or something else in the PSU that is close to failure due to the first "burn out" and in this case the voltage going to your console might not be stable and burn MOSFETs or even worse in your console. So don't experiment with power... you play with the fire.

#5 drewis

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 02:55 PM

Yes, +1... General rule: Companies/factories fix psu's... consumers dont.... not worth the hassle. and its dangerous


#6 RDC

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 06:38 PM

If something is repaired right then it'll last just as long as it would have if it never broke to begin with.

The typical SMPS shouldn't be messed with unless you know exactly what you're doing, regardless if someone tells you what you should try too fix it or not. There is more than just the mains voltage in there to worry about and even if the PSU isn't working properly there can still be dangerous voltages present in there, even after the power is removed.

The $20-$40 you'll spend on a new PSU is far safer than sticking test leads in some place you have no idea what's going on, and taking the 'shotgun' approach to fixing electronics will cost you far more in the long run versus just getting a new one, even more if you know exactly what you're looking for as the experience and tools didn't come from thin air. So on the one hand it is better to know how to repair something versus just replacing it, but that doesn't mean it's going to be any cheaper or easier.

If you're interested in learning how that type of thing works and want to get into repairing it then start off by looking up what components do what in general, without having that base knowledge to build on you're not going to learn anything, and you'll learn even less if someone else tells you what to replace to fix it.

Edited by RDC, 31 March 2010 - 06:39 PM.


#7 JFreezus

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 04:54 AM

where to start....first off there's a transformer in the psu the converts 120 to something like 26v....that might need replacing....


then there's the diode bridge......might need replacing.....


then there's the switching regulators....might need replacing....


the list can go on and on and on.....


unless you know what your doing....dont mess with power supplies!

That's why it says on pc power supplies "do not open unless you are a professional technician" or something like that.

I am a professional technician and even I wouldn't start trying to fix a power supply that I did not have a schematic for and the engineer who designed it with me there.

#8 RDC

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:17 AM

QUOTE(JFreezus @ Mar 31 2010, 11:54 PM) View Post
where to start....first off there's a transformer in the psu the converts 120 to something like 26v....that might need replacing....

A SMPS doesn't work that way, that's how a Linear PSU works.

QUOTE
I am a professional technician and even I wouldn't start trying to fix a power supply that I did not have a schematic for and the engineer who designed it with me there.

That's a contradictory statement, if you were a professional technician you wouldn't really need a schematic to troubleshoot the preregulator stage of an SMPS, and if you did you'd just make one up for it or the circuit in question as you go thru it, that's what I do. wink.gif

@ linsonchan - With all of the different versions of PSUs that are out now, as well as multiple versions of each one of those, it's still not worth it to get in there and go messing around unless you know what you're doing and have the time/money to spend on tinkering with it That's provided you can even find replacements for some of those components as that's one of the main hurdles you'll run into when repairing things now, there's no way to cross reference some parts, or you'll find very little documentation on them. So you're left with knowing what the part pretty much is, but can't get the specifics on it, and while tossing in some generic replacement in a Linear PSU isn't going to fry it up like an egg, with an SMPS that's just asking for something to blow up in your face when it's plugged back in.

No one here is trying to talk you out of learning something new, but an SMPS really is not a good place to start out, because of the complexity of it as well as the danger in working on one.

Edited by RDC, 01 April 2010 - 11:19 AM.


#9 JFreezus

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 04:58 PM

QUOTE(RDC @ Apr 1 2010, 06:17 AM) View Post

A SMPS doesn't work that way, that's how a Linear PSU works.
That's a contradictory statement, if you were a professional technician you wouldn't really need a schematic to troubleshoot the preregulator stage of an SMPS, and if you did you'd just make one up for it or the circuit in question as you go thru it, that's what I do. wink.gif

@ linsonchan - With all of the different versions of PSUs that are out now, as well as multiple versions of each one of those, it's still not worth it to get in there and go messing around unless you know what you're doing and have the time/money to spend on tinkering with it That's provided you can even find replacements for some of those components as that's one of the main hurdles you'll run into when repairing things now, there's no way to cross reference some parts, or you'll find very little documentation on them. So you're left with knowing what the part pretty much is, but can't get the specifics on it, and while tossing in some generic replacement in a Linear PSU isn't going to fry it up like an egg, with an SMPS that's just asking for something to blow up in your face when it's plugged back in.

No one here is trying to talk you out of learning something new, but an SMPS really is not a good place to start out, because of the complexity of it as well as the danger in working on one.



Sorry...drunk posting




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