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Gameshark Cheats With Spaces In Them?


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#1 SoberWarlock

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 04:28 PM

Does gameshark cheats matter if they have spaces on them? Here is an example of what i'm talking about:

In this site where I found the cheats they have no space

Gameshark Cheats for Leon (RESIDENT EVIL 2) (DUAL SHOCK VER.)

Infinite Health

800c7e7a00c8


On the PCSXbox; PSX Emulator for xbox, the codelist.inf gave me:

"Leon-Codes\Infinite Health
800C6B52 00FF

Edited by SoberWarlock, 06 August 2010 - 04:29 PM.


#2 cheema201

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 06:29 PM

Gameshark codes are set up in a certain way.. The first two numbers represents basically wat type of code it is. Usually $30 or $80 (but obviously joker codes and things start with a $DO or $D1 etc).

With your $30 codes you are only editing 8 bits of information (or two numbers), with $80 your looking at 16 bit (or four numbers). And basically if you have codes that are 'side by side' you can use an $80 instead of having two codes that begin with $30... That all sounds a bit confusing, so i'll try get to your question.

The reason why there is the space there is because after the space is the value of the code. Think of it like this, with the code you gave as an example 800C7E7A 00C8. the first part of the code is what we call the address. so the 0C7E7A is the address of Leon's health (at least if that code is correct) after that the health has been given a value to be constantly C8 (By the way, this code creates redundant data. You would get the same results if there was a $3 at the start of the code instead of an $8. For the reason that the two numbers after the address are set to zeros.) Anyways, that C8 = 200 in decimal. So that will have Leon's health constantly set at 200. But the other code you mentions puts it at FF or 255, which is obviously maxed out. Unless the health is kept at two seperate addresses.

In short, the only reason why the 'space' is there is so that it is easy to decipher between what the address of the code is, and what value it is given. So that if you changed the FF or C8 at the end of your code to say 1, then Leon's health would sit on 1, until the code was turned off.

The actual gameshark programs that are set up on the xbox wont give you the option to put a space between them anyways, so there is no real way that you can enter the wrong code.. And the reason for the difference in codes is possibly because one code is for the PAL version and the other is for NTSC, but I am surprised by the C8. Most people just play it safe and throw it to FF for max, but purists will want to find out the exact maximum health that can be obtained, which may account for the C8.

Sorry if that rambled on a bit, I'm sure that hex coding is not all that interesting haha. But making your own codes can be enjoyable.

#3 SoberWarlock

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 05:34 AM

I think I understand the concept. So the beginning is the actual code to unlock and the second half is just added space to help you identify the "value" for the code so you can edit when ever you want to. The space just makes it easier to read when you want to change that value. So if it was a health code you can change that value to make it read 50 is max, not saying that is exact but just an example.

There really isn't any reason for me to edit codes anyways. I just can't get Resident Evil 2 to work since the giving gameshark codes are all for PAL i'm guessing since none are giving in a regular language. Infact the only English giving codes for RE2 is labeled [FRENCH] at the end. What a bizzare occurance.

#4 cheema201

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 05:58 AM

If you cant get codes to work then you have every reason to edit them...

But the part that you will need to edit will be the address, not the first two numbers or last four. Though in this instance it would not hurt to change the first number to a 3, since this code is an 8 bit code.

Even though there will be differences between pal and ntsc games, the position of the codes stays constant..

For instance, I'll use a really easy example.

lets say this, in the NTSC version, Leon's health is stored at the address '2' (obviously this is impossible since 2 is but a single number, but lets run with it.)

Now lets say that in the PAL versions Leon's health is stored at the address '5' (having a total difference of 3).

Now if found the address for Leon's ammo, lets say that was '7' for the PAL version, then it would be '4' in the NTSC version because there is an absolute difference of 3.

Now this is not for every single code between the versions, but it will work for 99% of them.

All you need to do is find the same code for your version, and the other version... Then once you know the difference between them, it will not matter which version you find codes for, as you will simply need to do a little maths. The calculator on windows handles hex calculation with ease!




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